What Will The Next Generation Think?

Do you think kids born in 2011 will recognize any of the following?

I personally am disturbed to read that some of the things listed below might be obsolete in the next 20 years. Hand written letters? NO, say it’s not so!

Video tape: Starting this year, the news stories we produce here at Money Talks have all been shot, edited, and distributed to TV stations without ever being on any kind of tape. Not only that, the tape-less broadcast camera we use today offers much higher quality than anything that could have been imagined 10 years ago — and cost less than the lens on the camera we were using previously.

The separation of work and home: When you’re carrying an email-equipped computer in your pocket, it’s not just your friends who can find you — so can your boss. For kids born this year, the wall between office and home will be blurry indeed.

Books, magazines, and newspapers: Like video tape, words written on dead trees are on their way out. Sure, there may be books — but for those born today, stores that exist solely to sell them will be as numerous as record stores are now.

Watches: Maybe as quaint jewelry, but the correct time is on your smartphone, which is pretty much always in your hand.

Paper maps: At one time these were available free at every gas station. They’re practically obsolete today, and the next generation will probably have to visit a museum to find one.

Wired phones: Why would you pay $35 every month to have a phone that plugs into a wall? For those born today, this will be a silly concept.

Long distance: Thanks to the Internet, the days of paying more to talk to somebody in the next city, state, or even country are limited.

Newspaper classifieds: The days are gone when you have to buy a bunch of newsprint just to see what’s for sale.

Dial-up Internet: While not everyone is on broadband, it won’t be long before dial-up Internet goes the way of the plug-in phone.

Encyclopedias: Imagine a time when you had to buy expensive books that were outdated before the ink was dry. This will be a nonsense term for babies born today.

Forgotten friends: Remember when an old friend would bring up someone you went to high school with, and you’d say, “Oh yeah, I forgot about them!” The next generation will automatically be in touch with everyone they’ve ever known even slightly via Facebook.

CDs: First records, then 8-track, then cassette, then CDs — replacing your music collection used to be an expensive pastime. Now it’s cheap(er) and as close as the nearest Internet connection.

Film cameras: For the purist, perhaps, but for kids born today, the word “film” will mean nothing. In fact, even digital cameras — both video and still — are in danger of extinction as our pocket computers take over that function too.

Yellow and White Pages: Why in the world would you need a 10-pound book just to find someone?

Catalogs: There’s no need to send me a book in the mail when I can see everything you have for sale anywhere, anytime. If you want to remind me to look at it, send me an email.

Fax machines: Can you say “scan,” “.pdf” and “email?”

One picture to a frame: Such a waste of wall/counter/desk space to have a separate frame around each picture. Eight gigabytes of pictures and/or video in a digital frame encompassing every person you’ve ever met and everything you’ve ever done — now, that’s efficient. Especially compared to what we used to do: put our friends and relatives together in a room and force them to watch what we called a “slide show” or “home movies.”

Wires: Wires connecting phones to walls? Wires connecting computers, TVs, stereos, and other electronics to each other? Wires connecting computers to the Internet? To kids born in 2011, that will make as much sense as an electric car trailing an extension cord.

Hand-written letters: For that matter, hand-written anything. When was the last time you wrote cursive? In fact, do you even know what the word “cursive” means? Kids born in 2011 won’t — but they’ll put you to shame on a tiny keyboard.

Talking to one person at a time: Remember when it was rude to be with one person while talking to another on the phone? Kids born today will just assume that you’re supposed to use texting to maintain contact with five or six other people while pretending to pay attention to the person you happen to be physically next to.

Retirement plans: Yes, Johnny, there was a time when all you had to do was work at the same place for 20 years and they’d send you a check every month for as long as you lived. In fact, some companies would even pay your medical bills, too!

Hiding: Not long ago, if you didn’t answer your home phone, that was that — nobody knew if you were alive or dead, much less where you might be. Now your phone is not only in your pocket, it can potentially tell everyone — including advertisers — exactly where you are.

Alternate Uses For Coffee Filters

Ever buy the wrong size coffee filters? Instead of bringing them back to the store, here’s some other uses I found for them. Even if they aren’t the wrong size for your coffee maker, they can still be a perfect solution to many small problems around the house.

  1. Use them to clean your cable connectors. If you’re internet is lagging or your TV picture is fuzzy, it might be because the connectors on your cables are dirty and they need to be cleaned.
  2. They’re the perfect fix to stop bleeding from razor nicks when shaving.
  3. Use them to absorb the grease from fried foods. Put them on the plate and put your french fries, bacon and other fried food on top.
  4. Use a coffee filter to cover dishes when they’re cooking in the microwave to prevent messes.
  5. Use them to clean windows, mirrors, television screens and glasses. They’re lint free, so they won’t leave any residue behind when you’re done.
  6. Stop that Popsicle from dripping all over the place. Poke one or two holes in the filter and put the stick(s) through it.
  7. Line your plant pots with a filter to keep the soil from leaking out of the drainage holes when you water them.
  8. Put a filter inside cast-iron skillets to absorb excess moisture when it’s not in use to prevent rust and other wear.
  9. Separate your China and other good dishes by putting a coffee filter between each dish.
  10. Did the cork break into your wine? Use one to filter the cork out.
  11. Use a coffee filter to apply shoe polish.
  12. Put baking soda into a coffee filter and put it into shoes or a closet to absorb and prevent nasty odors. You can even put potpourri into the filter, tie it up and put into your drawers, etc.
  13. Use them to safely store your Christmas decorations and other small, fragile items.
  14. Use them store nails, screws and other small hardware so that they don’t go rolling all over the place, get lost or mixed together.
  15. You can use the cone-style coffee filters to safely pour in oil and other liquids into your car’s engine.
  16. Use them as bowls for popcorn, chips and other snacks.
  17. Liquids or something else spill onto your floor, sofa or other upholstery? Use a coffee filter to clean it up because unlike a paper towel, they won’t leave behind lint.
  18. Wrap them around tacos shells or hot dogs to prevent the grease and other things from spilling out.
  19. Did you run out of dryer sheets? You can put a few drops of fabric softener on a filter, rub sides together, and put in the dryer to help prevent static cling and make your clothes smell fresh.
  20.  Bring them along when you are working out. They’re great to wipe sweat and other oils off your face.

An Outpouring of LOVE!

YOU have done it again friend. Your donations to Interfaith Services of Tuolumne County exceeded $22,000.00 and over 2600 coats were delivered as well as over a ton of food! These resources will be used to help those less fortunate in Tuolumne county for months to come. Keep an eye out on www.mymotherlode.com for a complete news story with exact totals, coming in the next couple of days. God Bless you and Merry Christmas. Remember, if you are in need of assistance, Interfaith would like to help. Read this news article written by KVML’s Mark Truppner back in 2009, it has all the info for you. Clicke here for the article.

Santa Fly-In Food & Coat Drive 2010

Here’s your opportunity to help our neighbors in need this Christmas! There’s 3 ways to help out, just click on the picture of Santa to learn more. Thanks in advance!

-The Crew at Star 92.7

Feet Friendly

Sometimes beauty really is pain, especially when it comes to women’s footwear. But it doesn’t have to be, thanks to the latest advancements in orthopedic products that specifically cater to ladies’ shoe dilemmas. We found eight solutions to the most common shoe problems, including heel slippage, digging straps and chaffing rubber, so you’ll be able to wear all of your favorite footwear—pain-free.

Stable Ground

While stiletto heels guarantee gorgeous gams, they often get stuck in soft ground or cracks, both of which can destroy expensive shoes and make for an uneasy walk. To better tread on tricky terrain, attach a clear or black protector to your heel tip that subtly increases its surface area. The tip removes easily for times when you’re on more solid ground. SoleMates High Heeler, from $9.95;

Spot On

It’s tough to predict where a shoe will rub you the wrong way. Clear and ultra-slim, these dainty peel-and-stick gel spots offer an invisible protective layer. Just put them in your purse so you can stick one of them right where it hurts whenever you feel pain. Gel Spots, pack of 6, $8

On the Ball

Available in so many cute patterns—tiger and leopard and zebra, oh my!—these flower-shaped ball-of-foot cushions look anything but frumpy. Slip them into the fronts of your shoes to fend off calluses and keep excess bone pressure at bay. Tip Toes, prices start at $6.95

Glide Wear

If your shoes are simply too strappy to conceal an insole or grip—or you need an easy on-the-go option to prevent friction sores—try rubbing on some relief. This stick leaves behind a clear, waxy finish that forms an antifriction protective layer. Dr. Scholl’s For Her Rub Relief Stick, $6.50

Toe Pick

A casual flip-flop or chic dress sandal can wreak havoc on the sensitive skin between your toes. These genius gel cushions, which slip discreetly under the ball of your foot and around the thong, keep both the ball of your foot and your toes in place, helping to prevent the slip-and-slide that can cause painful blisters. KIWI Smiling Feet In Between the Toe Gel Cushions, $4.99

Head over Heels

Shoes that are too big for you or weighted down in the front (think platform pumps) can cause serious heel slippage. Luckily, stick-on heel grips correct a finicky fit by creating a textured layer to hold your foot in place. Heel Grips, $3

Cushioned Edge

Putting an extra spring in your step has never been easier. Staying just within the parameter of your shoes, these super-skinny ¾ insoles fit into open-toe shoes and sandals, providing extra cushioning and ensuring your tootsies will feel totally comfy—but your look will remain clean and stylish. Killer Kushionz, prices start at $6.50

Pain in the Strap

Before you relegate agonizing slingbacks and thong sandals to the category of regrettable purchases, strap these on for size. Available in four colors, these thin strips adhere to the inside of your shoe straps to help prevent painful blisters and ugly red marks caused by slipping straps and excess friction. Strappy Strips, prices start at $3.50

Spices For Health

The colder weather is beckoning us back to our kitchens. Break out the spices to bring warmth, robust flavor, and a bounty of health benefits, including higher energy, increased immunity, and other life-enhancing surprises.

Here are some spices that you can start cooking with right away to elevate your longevity and health!

1 Garlic wards off heart disease

Garlic, the spicy favorite in Italian fare, has been shown to improve cholesterol and lower blood pressure. According to the National Health and Medical Research Council, consuming half to one clove of garlic daily may reduce cholesterol by nearly ten percent. Your breath might suffer, but your heart will thank you. As an antibacterial, garlic is often used to treat minor infections.

2. Spotlight on cinnamon

Another ancient spice to recently come under scientific investigation is cinnamon. In the United States, cinnamon is usually thought of as the delicious spice in apple pie filling, but in other parts of the world, especially India and Asia, cinnamon has been used as a healing herb for centuries. Research is finally catching up to the wisdom of the East; many clinical studies have linked cinnamon consumption to lowered blood sugar. Both in vitro and human studies show improvement in insulin sensitivity with cinnamon polyphenols, as well as improvement in total and LDL cholesterol. Cinnamon is also thought to detoxify the system and stimulate brain function. Its antiseptic properties give it the ability to fight bladder infection, and if taken in the first 48 hours, a cup of strong cinnamon tea might just nip a bladder infection in the bud. Keep in mind that mixed study results make it difficult to prove these benefits on paper — but it doesn’t hurt to sprinkle a teaspoon into your next bowl of oatmeal.

3. Curry for joint health

Are your aching joints not jumping for joy in these autumn days? Try sprinkling some curry on your veggie omelet. Curry, a staple spice combo in Southeast Asian cuisine, contains turmeric, the yellow spice that gives curry its distinctive color. The active component in turmeric is called curcumin. If you are a fan of curry, you will be happy to know that this substance is associated with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, anti-tumor, and anti-amyloid properties; amyloids are plaque-like proteins that build up in brain tissue, and are responsible for diseases like Alzheimer’s and rheumatoid arthritis. In one randomized control study 107 patients with knee osteoarthritis received either 800 mg per day ibuprofen or 2 grams per day Curcuma domestica extract. Both groups showed improvement in pain on level walking and climbing stairs.

4. Star Anise aids digestion

As the name suggests, star anise is indeed star-shaped. Though it is not actually related to anise, star anise shares a similar licorice flavor, due to its content of anethole. Used to bring out flavor in slow-cooked meat dishes and long-simmered soups, this spice frequently makes an appearance in Indian cuisine and is an ingredient of the traditional five-spice powder of Chinese cooking. Star anise has been used in a tea to remedy rheumatism, and the seeds are sometimes chewed after meals to aid digestion.

Special combinations of spices and herbs can bring you a powerful immune zoom; one that includes star anise in the mix is the 5 Elements of Health, which promotes a strong immune function and balances the energies of your whole body.

5. Cardamom improves energy

Found in curries, rice dishes, herbal teas, and breads, cardamom is the spice that gives chai tea its main flavor. In Asia, cardamom has long been valued medicinally for its ability to increase circulation and improve energy. Considered an aphrodisiac in the Middle East, cardamom may also improve digestion, asthma, bronchitis, halitosis, and even help improve a bad mood.

6. Clove curbs cramping

A delicious addition to cooked fruit, roasts, sweet vegetable dishes, and teas, clove has been used since ancient times in India to improve digestive function. You may chew on some to alleviate toothaches, sore throats, diarrhea, and stomach cramps.

7. Cumin boosts immunity

An excellent addition to meat curries, stews, vegetables, seafood, and sauces, cumin is thought to boost the immune system and also to improve liver function, reduce flatulence, and aid in digestion.

8. Fennel Seed soothes your intestines

Often used to spice up recipes with meat, beans, or legumes, fennel helps digestion in two ways: It stimulates the production of gastric juices and also soothes the nervous system, regulating the action of the muscles that line the intestine.

9. Ginger: Remedies aches and nausea

A perfect compliment to vegetables, marinades, and sweets, ginger is also delicious in tea. Ginger may help relieve nausea, arthritis, headaches, menstrual cramps, and muscle soreness.

A word of warning: always discuss with your physician before treating conditions with spices to avoid any adverse interactions; for example, because garlic and ginger possess natural blood-thinning properties, individuals about to undergo surgery and those taking blood thinners should take extra precaution.

To maintain peak flavor, use spices within six months — but the spice police won’t come knocking at your door if you keep them longer. They like to hang out in a cool, dark place in your pantry to preserve their oils and prevent loss of pungent flavors.

Halloween Luminarias

A nice change from the traditional luminaria where you use lunch bag weighted down with sand, place a candle inside to light the way for Trick or Treaters….Get crafty & read on. – Maryann

Make Luminarias with the kids to light up your porch for Halloween!

You Will Need:

  • Containers: Widemouth glass jars, plastic soft drink or water bottles (2-liter and smaller), milk cartons
  • Papers: Lightweight craft paper, copy paper, construction paper, paper twist, tissue paper, decorative papers and so forth
  • Ties: Raffia; orange and black ribbons
  • Light sources: Tea lights, battery-operated candles or white Christmas lights
  • Scissors, utility knife
  • Tape
  • Glue stick
  • Sand
  • Optional: plastic spiders, netting, highlighting markers … be creative!

1. Remove labels and carefully cut plastic bottles or milk cartons below the neck to a variety of heights.

2. Wrap paper around each container, so it’s even at the bottom and several inches past the top edge. Tape the back. (You can color in “eyes” with a highlighting marker for an extra-spooky effect, or fringe the top.)

3. Wrap ribbon or raffia around the bottle and tie a bow or knot; add spiders, netting or other accents.

4. Weight with sand to keep the luminarias upright and from blowing around the neighborhood.

5. Position a tea light in the center of each bottle (do not use in bottles 20 ounces and smaller), OR use a safer alternative — Christmas lights or battery-operated candles. If using Christmas lights, cut an X through the back (both paper and container) of each luminaria with a utility knife and push the bulb through.

Miniature Pumpkin Candle Holders

Decorating for Halloween, easily!
 
I saw miniture pumpkins used as candleholders and thought they looked so cute & festive…thought I’d share.
 
All you need is:
 
Assorted gourds, carnival squash, or miniature pumpkins
Pumpkin carving tools (a lid-cutter saw)
Sharp knife
Taper and votive candles

What to Do
1. Insert the knife into the center of the gourd near the stem. Be careful, as gourds are very hard. Wedge the knife back and forth a little until you have a slit of about an inch. Remove the knife.

2. Insert lid-cutter saw and gently and patiently saw — with an up-and-down sawing motion, (don’t try to slice) — a circle in the center of the gourd. Don’t push too hard or the saw can break. If this happens, try to finish the work with a grapefruit knife or apple corer. When the ends of the circle meet, remove the section of the gourd.

3. Drizzle a few drops of candle wax in the hole and insert a taper or votive candle.

Got Milk? Or Milk It’s NOT just for Breakfast!

Got Milk? Or Milk It’s NOT just for Breakfast!

(Beauty tips from Maryann Curmi)

Cleopatra knew about the beautifying properties of milk: she took baths in it! Skin-softening, moisturizing, and filled with nutrients, milk has been a favorite beauty aid for millennia.

Find out how milk can help you to have smoother, more radiant skin. Simple, delicious recipes and formulas for your greater beauty, right here:

Use organic milk if at all possible.

Oily Skin Cleanser

Apply skim milk to your face and then rinse thoroughly with water.

Normal, Dry, or Mature Skin Cleanser

Use whole milk, applying gently to face and then rinsing thoroughly with water.

Gentle Facial Scrub for Oily Skin

Mix 1 teaspoon powdered skim milk with 1 teaspoon honey. Add a few drops of fresh lemon juice, and gently massage face with this mixture. Rinse thoroughly.

Gentle Facial Scrub for Normal, Dry, or Mature Skin

Mix 1 teaspoon powdered whole milk with 1 teaspoon honey and gently massage face with mixture. Rinse thoroughly with plenty of water.

And for the rest of your body……

Cleopatra’s Milk Bath
try this classic formula!

You could also use 1 cup of instant whole milk, instead of liquid milk.

Milk and Honey Bath

A favorite skin-soother: To a warm bath, add 2 drops lavender oil, 1 tablespoon honey, and 2 tablespoons whole milk powder (or 1 cup liquid whole milk). Soak as long as you like, then shower to remove all traces of milk and honey.

Milk and Honey Shower Gel

Pour a little honey into the palm of your hand and add some whole milk powder, mixing to form a gel. Use as you would any shower gel. (Guaranteed to leave your skin feeling silky soft and smooth.)


Body-Building Pre-Shampoo Hair Pack

Great for fine or lifeless hair, this will add body and luster:
Mix about 1/4 cup dry milk powder with enough water to make a paste, then gently massage the paste into your hair. Cover hair with a hot, damp towel and allow to remain on hair for about 30 minutes, changing the towel when it cools to keep the heat. Rinse and shampoo.

Cutting Your Own Bangs

Shh … don’t tell your stylist but we think it’s totally okay to trim your own tresses between visits.

How-To:

1. Start with dry hair, styled as you usually wear it.
2. Section out your bangs (and face framing layers if you plan to trim those too) and put the rest of your hair back in a ponytail or pins.
3. Decide where you want your bangs to end (mid forehead, eyebrows, cheekbones …). Then, comb bangs straight down with the comb teeth facing away from your forehead. Stop the comb at the level you’ve chosen and let it act as a barrier.
4. Start cutting at the center of your forehead and work your way to the sides – that way it’s easier to see the shape you’re creating. Snip your hair with the scissors pointing at a 45 degree angle (never straight across). Be sure not to cut your bangs any shorter than where the comb rests.
5. When you’re finished, shake out your bangs and try combing them in a couple of different directions to make sure you didn’t miss any sections.
6. Let down the rest of your hair and blend if necessary.

Voila! Fabulous bangs that you can take all the credit for!