Homemade FUN With KIDS

I had a wonderful time recently playing with my 31/2 year old great niece Alayna.  I introduced her to Shadow Play. We both had a blast. All you need is a bright light (a good strong flashlight will work) and a white sheet.   Hang the sheet taut (we took a fitted sheet and stretched at around a couple of dining room chairs) and place the bright light behind you. Then make hand shadows or use the whole body!
 
Homemade Playdough (2 recipes)
All of the playdough recipes below are for children aged 2 years or older and require adult supervision at all times.

Rubbery Playdough

2 cups baking soda
1 1/2 cups water
1 cup cornstarch

Mix with a fork until smooth. Boil over medium heat until thick. Spoon onto plate or wax paper.

Nature’s Playdough

1 cup flour
1/2 cup salt
1 cup water
2 tablespoons oil
2 tablespoons cream of tartar
beet, spinach, and carrot juice

Mix flour, salt and oil, and slowly add the water. Cook over medium heat, stirring until dough becomes stiff. Turn out onto wax paper and let cool. Knead the playdough with your hands until of proper consistency. Use as is, or divide into balls and add a few drops of the vegetable juices to make green, pink, and orange.

Family Day – A Day To Eat Dinner With Your Children (Sept 27)

To encourage parents to frequently eat dinner with their kids and be involved in their children’s lives.  www.casaFamilyDay.org 

Empty Seats: Fewer Families Eat Together

According to the most recent Bureau of Labor Statistics data:

78% of women with children between the ages of 6 and 17 work outside the home 31% of households with children are single-parent families up from 13% in 1970

Kids take part in more after-school activities than ever, and many parents have to go straight from work to soccer practice, piano lessons, or car pools. There simply isn’t much time available for cooking, and eating is often done on the run.

Data from Gallup Poll* confirms that having dinner together in the evening is difficult for today’s families.

Slightly more than a quarter (28%) of adults with children under the age of 18 report that their families eat dinner together at home seven nights a week — down from 37% in 2009. Almost half (47%) of parents say their families eat together between four and six times a week. Another quarter (24%) say they eat together three or fewer nights a week.

THINGS YOUR GRANDFATHER WAS DOING BY THE TIME HE WAS YOUR AGE

I read this on the air and broke down cause I realized all 4 of my grandparents are gone. Very powerful stuff here. Hug a grandparent today! – Justin Flores

We live in an age of babies. I’m dead serious. By the time your grandfather was your age — 30 or 40 — he’d already lived 3 lives.

* CIVIL RIGHTS — Your grandfather was dealing with the issue of civil rights, segregation and race relations. No matter what race he was, this was an issue he was no doubt facing. The structure of entire cities, such as Detroit, Chicago and Los Angeles, were irreversibly changed because of racial riots that broke out two generations ago.

* HE FIXED HIS CAR BY HIMSELF — Nowadays, when a light comes on the dashboard we automatically take the car to the shop. We never think that we can fix the car by ourselves. With all of the electronics being used today, it’s easy to just leave it to the dealership to fix. Fifty years ago, however, it’s likely that most problems could have been fixed with some grease and a wrench.

* HE HITCHHIKED, OR PICKED UP A HITCHHIKER — In fact, after he left the military he probably did something awesome like hitchhike across the state… or the country.

* HE WAS IN WWII, KOREA, VIETNAM, OR IN DANGER OF BEING DRAFTED — We’re currently dealing with the war on terrorism, but your grandfather had to deal with the war against communism — and the knowledge that if he didn’t join up Uncle Sam would join him up. Today’s solider made the decision for themselves — your grandfather likely had the decision made for him.

* HE SHAVED WITH A STRAIGHT RAZOR — Four blades? Try one single blade, shaped like a knife.

* HE WAS GENUINELY PATRIOTIC — In the 1950s and early 1960s patriotism wasn’t just an idea talked about on Fox News, it was a common sentiment. America was coming off of World War II and there was a large amount of national pride. Rosie the Riveter had cemented the idea that everyone had pitched in and helped the United States win the war. This helped to reinforce a patriotic attitude that your grandfather still holds today.